Archive for June, 2014

The corridor “Gibiroso”

Posted: June 21, 2014 in Uncategorized

 

Turmoil in Egypt continues despite the crackdown on the Muslim Brotherhood and Egyptian people increasingly identify themselves as being members of one of two enemy groups. 
For this photo-essay, I traveled to Rwanda to explore how, nearly two decades after the fastest genocide in history, The Rwanda genocide supplanted orphans who still struggle lack of opportunities, terminally diseases, loneliness and distrust, which threaten the new generation to follow the same pattern. 
Hundreds of orphans from Rwanda‘s 1994 genocide still struggle in Kigali’s slums, many working as drug dealers or prostitutes to stay alive. Life in the Gibiroso district is proof that one of Africa’s greatest tragedies is not nearly over. It asks the question: How did these divisions grow so bitter and what can Egypt learn from Rwanda‘s tragedy?

The corridor Gebiloso in Kigali, Rwanda. Wednesday, Nov 20, 2013. Hundreds of orphans from Rwanda's 1994 genocide still struggle in Kigali's slums, many working as drug dealers or prostitutes to stay alive. (Photo/Hamada Elrasam)

The corridor Gebiloso in Kigali, Rwanda. Wednesday, Nov 20, 2013. Hundreds of orphans from Rwanda’s 1994 genocide still struggle in Kigali’s slums, many working as drug dealers or prostitutes to stay alive. (Photo/Hamada Elrasam)

Kuitonda David, a 24 year old, lines up billiards balls before a game starts at a pool table where he works in Gibiloso, Kigali, Rwanda. Wed, Nov 27, 2013. (Photo/Hamada Elrasam)

Kuitonda David, a 24 year old, lines up billiards balls before a game starts at a pool table where he works in Gibiloso, Kigali, Rwanda. Wed, Nov 27, 2013. (Photo/Hamada Elrasam)

Kuitonda David, a 24 year old, hits the white ball during a Billiards game in a Billiards palce where he works in Gibiloso, Kigali, Rwanda. Wed, Nov 27, 2013. (Photo/Hamada Elrasam)

Kuitonda David, a 24 year old, hits the white ball during a Billiards game in a Billiards palce where he works in Gibiloso, Kigali, Rwanda. Wed, Nov 27, 2013. (Photo/Hamada Elrasam)

Kuitonda David, a 24 year old at his room in a Billiards palce where he works with Vergin Merry and poronostar posters hanged on the wall while his work mate Nzamwita Afrodis, who is HIV positive and another guest sleep on the only bed in the room in Gibiloso, Kigali, Rwanda. Wed, Nov 27, 2013. (Photo/Hamada Elrasam)

Kuitonda David, a 24 year old at his room in a Billiards palce where he works with Vergin Merry and poronostar posters hanged on the wall while his work mate Nzamwita Afrodis, who is HIV positive and another guest sleep on the only bed in the room in Gibiloso, Kigali, Rwanda. Wed, Nov 27, 2013. (Photo/Hamada Elrasam)

Belusi (L) walks accompany Vansing second (L) while he talks to a man in the street while his friends Mushumba Mwiza (R) 25 years old watchs the mans wallet as a trap to steal him near Gibiloso, Kigali, Rwanda. Fri, Nov 15, 2013. Orphans of the Rwandan genocide, Van-Sing and others were left picking pockets, gambling and fighting for money. (Photo/Hamada Elrasam)

Belusi (L) walks accompany Vansing second (L) while he talks to a man in the street while his friends Mushumba Mwiza (R) 25 years old watchs the mans wallet as a trap to steal him near Gibiloso, Kigali, Rwanda. Fri, Nov 15, 2013. Orphans of the Rwandan genocide, Van-Sing and others were left picking pockets, gambling and fighting for money. (Photo/Hamada Elrasam)

Van-sing, a 20 years old (L) fights with his friend Belusi 19 years old as he just tried to steal him  in Gibiloso, Kigali, Rwanda. Fri, Nov 15, 2013. Vansing knows Belusi for 8 years. (Photo/Hamada Elrasam)

Van-sing, a 20 years old (L) fights with his friend Belusi 19 years old as he just tried to steal him in Gibiloso, Kigali, Rwanda. Fri, Nov 15, 2013. Vansing knows Belusi for 8 years. (Photo/Hamada Elrasam)

Van-sing, a 20 years old (R) drinks while he shares a meal with his friend Nshizirungu Amos 20 years old (L) in Chez Mama Fan resturant in Gibiloso, Kigali, Rwanda. Wed, Nov 13, 2013. Vansing knows  Nshizirungu Amos since he scaped the orphanage. Van-Sing says "Life in Giblioso is like jail but we have to share."  (Photo/Hamada Elrasam)

Van-sing, a 20 years old (R) drinks while he shares a meal with his friend Nshizirungu Amos 20 years old (L) in Chez Mama Fan resturant in Gibiloso, Kigali, Rwanda. Wed, Nov 13, 2013. Vansing knows Nshizirungu Amos since he scaped the orphanage. Van-Sing says “Life in Giblioso is like jail but we have to share.” (Photo/Hamada Elrasam)

Used condoms and condoms covers throughn on the ground in Gibiloso, Kigali, Rwanda. Wed, Nov 15, 2013.

Used condoms and condoms covers throughn on the ground in Gibiloso, Kigali, Rwanda. Wed, Nov 15, 2013.

Kayitesi Janet a 19 years old at Nadaguswi Chez Mamadada prostitution house in Gibiloso, Kigali. Mon, Nov 18, 2013. Kayitesi Janet, a 19 years old prostitute and a genocide orphan who is HIV positive said, "I didn't know what HIV meant a year ago.  I just recognized it when I was sick and the doctor asked me to test. Then I started medications. But I couldn't stop working.  I have to get food and pay transportation to the hospital when I get tired or when I go to receive medications. Sometimes I skip doses when the medicine finishes and I don't have enough money to go to the hospital to receive more.  At that moment I have to find a client or someone to give me money. Sometimes people here tell me you will die soon, which makes feel so scared and alone." (Photo/Hamada Elrasam

Kayitesi Janet a 19 years old at Nadaguswi Chez Mamadada prostitution house in Gibiloso, Kigali. Mon, Nov 18, 2013. Kayitesi Janet, a 19 years old prostitute and a genocide orphan who is HIV positive said, “I didn’t know what HIV meant a year ago. I just recognized it when I was sick and the doctor asked me to test. Then I started medications. But I couldn’t stop working. I have to get food and pay transportation to the hospital when I get tired or when I go to receive medications. Sometimes I skip doses when the medicine finishes and I don’t have enough money to go to the hospital to receive more. At that moment I have to find a client or someone to give me money. Sometimes people here tell me you will die soon, which makes feel so scared and alone.”
(Photo/Hamada Elrasam

Negnzi Alliy, a 23 year old (L) paint's a tattoo depects the Rwandan genocide slogan says in English  "never again" on Tomy's arm (R) in Titanic par in Gibiloso, Kigali, Rwanda. Tuesday, Nov 5, 2013. Negnzi Alliy says "I don't care about HIV transmission through my needles. Gibiloso is killing our generation softly." (Photo/Hamada Elrasam)

Negnzi Alliy, a 23 year old (L) paint’s a tattoo depects the Rwandan genocide slogan says in English “never again” on Tomy’s arm (R) in Titanic par in Gibiloso, Kigali, Rwanda. Tuesday, Nov 5, 2013. Negnzi Alliy says “I don’t care about HIV transmission through my needles. Gibiloso is killing our generation softly.”
(Photo/Hamada Elrasam)

Negnzi Alliy, a 23 year old getting payed for tattoo that he made with drugs in Titanic par in Gibiloso, Kigali, Rwanda. Tuesday, Nov 5, 2013. Negnzi Alliy says ""Many people ask me to make for them tattoos with anti-genocide slogans like 'Never Again' or 'strong survivors.'  Some others needs love tattoos.  Sometimes they pay with drugs or offer sex." (Photo/Hamada Elrasam)

Negnzi Alliy, a 23 year old getting payed for tattoo that he made with drugs in Titanic par in Gibiloso, Kigali, Rwanda. Tuesday, Nov 5, 2013. Negnzi Alliy says “”Many people ask me to make for them tattoos with anti-genocide slogans like ‘Never Again’ or ‘strong survivors.’ Some others needs love tattoos. Sometimes they pay with drugs or offer sex.” (Photo/Hamada Elrasam)

Negnzi Alliy, a 23 year old tattoo painter and genocide orphan at his house in Gibiloso, Kigali, Rwanda. (Photo/Hamada Elrasam)

Negnzi Alliy, a 23 year old tattoo painter and genocide orphan at his house in Gibiloso, Kigali, Rwanda. (Photo/Hamada Elrasam)

Shakuol, a 20 years old video editor and genocide orphan at his stodiu talks to clients while making wedding vedio editing in Gibiloso, Kigali, Rwanda. Wed, Nov 20, 2013. (Photo/Hamada Elrasam)

Shakuol, a 20 years old video editor and genocide orphan at his stodiu talks to clients while making wedding vedio editing in Gibiloso, Kigali, Rwanda. Wed, Nov 20, 2013. (Photo/Hamada Elrasam)

Shakuol, a 20 years old video editor and genocide orphan at his stodiu with African painting in the background depects a mom holds a baby in Gibiloso, Kigali, Rwanda. Wed, Nov 20, 2013. (Photo/Hamada Elrasam)

Shakuol, a 20 years old video editor and genocide orphan at his stodiu with African painting in the background depects a mom holds a baby in Gibiloso, Kigali, Rwanda. Wed, Nov 20, 2013. (Photo/Hamada Elrasam)

Nshizirungu Amos (L) and Vansing walks while young generation kids are coming in Gibiloso, Kigali, Rwanda. Wed, Nov 13, 2013.  The Rwanda genocide supplanted orphans who still struggle lack of opportunities, terminally diseases, loneliness and distrust, which threaten the new generation to follow the same pattern. (Photo/Hamada Elrasam)

Nshizirungu Amos (L) and Vansing walks while young generation kids are coming in Gibiloso, Kigali, Rwanda. Wed, Nov 13, 2013. The Rwanda genocide supplanted orphans who still struggle lack of opportunities, terminally diseases, loneliness and distrust, which threaten the new generation to follow the same pattern. (Photo/Hamada Elrasam)

 


Hundreds of orphans from Rwanda‘s 1994 genocide still struggle in Kigali’s slums, many working as drug dealers or prostitutes to stay alive.  Life in the Gibiloso district is proof that one of Africa’s greatest tragedies is not nearly over.

I visited Gibiloso in Kigali, Rwanda where many 1994 Genocide and HIV orphans struggle to survive.
Van-sing, a 20 years old Rwandan man, who escaped a cruel orphanage in a banana truck. “I liked bananas too much. I jumped in the truck to eat some banana and then I waited their until it reached somewhere and the driver discovered me and pushed me away! After then I came to Gibiloso to find the real family.”
Orphans of the Rwandan genocide, Van-Sing and others were left picking pockets, gambling and fighting for money. Van-Sing says “Life in Giblioso is like jail but we have to share.  We have to care from each other as well.  Children in Gibiloso also fight for survival. “I don’t like to see young kids suffering or fighting like I did,” Van-Sing added.
Kuitonda David, a 24 year old genocide orphan works on a pool table and shares bed with his work mate, Nzamwita Afrodis, who is HIV positive, said “Sometimes friends tell me, ‘You might get infected because of sharing things with him.’ It’s very hard to get a proper advice from people here, most of them are HIV positive and they can’t protect or advise themselves. As far as we share bed but we don’t actually meet.  The time I’m working he is sleeping and vice versa. But I always pray and ask the Virgin Merry to help me and protect me. She is my mom, my best friend.”Kayitesi Janet, a 19 years old prostitute and a genocide orphan who is HIV positive said, “I didn’t know what HIV meant a year ago.  I just recognized it when I was sick and the doctor asked me to test. Then I started medications. But I couldn’t stop working.  I have to get food and pay transportation to the hospital when I get tired or when I go to receive medications. Sometimes I skip doses when the medicine finishes and I don’t have enough money to go to the hospital to receive more.  At that moment I have to find a client or someone to give me money. Sometimes people here tell me you will die soon, which makes feel so scared and alone.”
Negnzi Alliy, a 23 year old tattoo painter and genocide orphan, said, “Many people ask me to make for them tattoos with anti-genocide slogans like ‘Never Again’ or ‘strong survivors.’  Some others needs love tattoos.  Sometimes they pay with drugs or offer sex. I don’t care about HIV transmission through my needles. Gibiloso is killing our generation softly.”

Shakuol, a 20 years old video editor and genocide orphan, said, “I’m working on editing video and recording music for some songs. Sometimes I make adds designs. I have been working many jobs until I got this computer and those sound system equipment.. At the moment my income is enough for electricity and house rent. It’s not enough to pay for internet even when I work all the day long. Sometimes I don’t get enough time to stay with my friends. But, every night before I go to sleep, I look at this African painting on the wall and memorize my mom who I lost during the genocide.”

The story on Voice Of America “VOA”

http://www.voanews.com/media/photogallery/sons-and-daughters-of-the-rwandan-genocide/1886581.html

The story on Panorama “Mada Masr”

http://panorama.madamasr.com/2014/the-continuing-effects-of-the-rawanda-genocide-by-hamada-elrasam/

Please click the link to watch the video