2014 in review

Posted: December 30, 2014 in Uncategorized

The WordPress.com stats helper monkeys prepared a 2014 annual report for this blog.

Here’s an excerpt:

A San Francisco cable car holds 60 people. This blog was viewed about 1,400 times in 2014. If it were a cable car, it would take about 23 trips to carry that many people.

Click here to see the complete report.

 The truth

During the last uprising wave and cracking down on Islamist in Egypt June 30, 2013. All the media outlets have been accused of taking a side, “when you point a camera to a side you neglect the rest of the real scene” Said a protester to me “People are following those media outlets which confirms what already in their minds, not to get new info!” he added. Apparently all parties involved in the conflict were violating the sense of “peace” which was the highlighted title for the Egyptian revolution since Jan 25, 2011.
For this project, I have been shooting in many events related to the last uprising wave conflict June 30 including storming Rabaa and it’s massacre, people celebrating the Islamist stepping down at the presidential palace, people celebrating the memory of Jan 25, 2014, protests, marches and the consequences for the Islamist. The referendum and the presidential elections process, and the Islamist trials.I decided, tripling exposures the events and gather scenes in one slide and giving the chance for the audience to see the hall scene the way they wants and see whatever they want to see!

 

 

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Image  —  Posted: September 21, 2014 in Uncategorized
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Turmoil in Egypt continues despite the crackdown on the Muslim Brotherhood and Egyptian people increasingly identify themselves as being members of one of two enemy groups. 
For this photo-essay, I traveled to Rwanda to explore how, nearly two decades after the fastest genocide in history, The Rwanda genocide supplanted orphans who still struggle lack of opportunities, terminally diseases, loneliness and distrust, which threaten the new generation to follow the same pattern. 
Hundreds of orphans from Rwanda‘s 1994 genocide still struggle in Kigali’s slums, many working as drug dealers or prostitutes to stay alive. Life in the Gibiroso district is proof that one of Africa’s greatest tragedies is not nearly over. It asks the question: How did these divisions grow so bitter and what can Egypt learn from Rwanda‘s tragedy?

The corridor Gebiloso in Kigali, Rwanda. Wednesday, Nov 20, 2013. Hundreds of orphans from Rwanda's 1994 genocide still struggle in Kigali's slums, many working as drug dealers or prostitutes to stay alive. (Photo/Hamada Elrasam)

The corridor Gebiloso in Kigali, Rwanda. Wednesday, Nov 20, 2013. Hundreds of orphans from Rwanda’s 1994 genocide still struggle in Kigali’s slums, many working as drug dealers or prostitutes to stay alive. (Photo/Hamada Elrasam)

Kuitonda David, a 24 year old, lines up billiards balls before a game starts at a pool table where he works in Gibiloso, Kigali, Rwanda. Wed, Nov 27, 2013. (Photo/Hamada Elrasam)

Kuitonda David, a 24 year old, lines up billiards balls before a game starts at a pool table where he works in Gibiloso, Kigali, Rwanda. Wed, Nov 27, 2013. (Photo/Hamada Elrasam)

Kuitonda David, a 24 year old, hits the white ball during a Billiards game in a Billiards palce where he works in Gibiloso, Kigali, Rwanda. Wed, Nov 27, 2013. (Photo/Hamada Elrasam)

Kuitonda David, a 24 year old, hits the white ball during a Billiards game in a Billiards palce where he works in Gibiloso, Kigali, Rwanda. Wed, Nov 27, 2013. (Photo/Hamada Elrasam)

Kuitonda David, a 24 year old at his room in a Billiards palce where he works with Vergin Merry and poronostar posters hanged on the wall while his work mate Nzamwita Afrodis, who is HIV positive and another guest sleep on the only bed in the room in Gibiloso, Kigali, Rwanda. Wed, Nov 27, 2013. (Photo/Hamada Elrasam)

Kuitonda David, a 24 year old at his room in a Billiards palce where he works with Vergin Merry and poronostar posters hanged on the wall while his work mate Nzamwita Afrodis, who is HIV positive and another guest sleep on the only bed in the room in Gibiloso, Kigali, Rwanda. Wed, Nov 27, 2013. (Photo/Hamada Elrasam)

Belusi (L) walks accompany Vansing second (L) while he talks to a man in the street while his friends Mushumba Mwiza (R) 25 years old watchs the mans wallet as a trap to steal him near Gibiloso, Kigali, Rwanda. Fri, Nov 15, 2013. Orphans of the Rwandan genocide, Van-Sing and others were left picking pockets, gambling and fighting for money. (Photo/Hamada Elrasam)

Belusi (L) walks accompany Vansing second (L) while he talks to a man in the street while his friends Mushumba Mwiza (R) 25 years old watchs the mans wallet as a trap to steal him near Gibiloso, Kigali, Rwanda. Fri, Nov 15, 2013. Orphans of the Rwandan genocide, Van-Sing and others were left picking pockets, gambling and fighting for money. (Photo/Hamada Elrasam)

Van-sing, a 20 years old (L) fights with his friend Belusi 19 years old as he just tried to steal him  in Gibiloso, Kigali, Rwanda. Fri, Nov 15, 2013. Vansing knows Belusi for 8 years. (Photo/Hamada Elrasam)

Van-sing, a 20 years old (L) fights with his friend Belusi 19 years old as he just tried to steal him in Gibiloso, Kigali, Rwanda. Fri, Nov 15, 2013. Vansing knows Belusi for 8 years. (Photo/Hamada Elrasam)

Van-sing, a 20 years old (R) drinks while he shares a meal with his friend Nshizirungu Amos 20 years old (L) in Chez Mama Fan resturant in Gibiloso, Kigali, Rwanda. Wed, Nov 13, 2013. Vansing knows  Nshizirungu Amos since he scaped the orphanage. Van-Sing says "Life in Giblioso is like jail but we have to share."  (Photo/Hamada Elrasam)

Van-sing, a 20 years old (R) drinks while he shares a meal with his friend Nshizirungu Amos 20 years old (L) in Chez Mama Fan resturant in Gibiloso, Kigali, Rwanda. Wed, Nov 13, 2013. Vansing knows Nshizirungu Amos since he scaped the orphanage. Van-Sing says “Life in Giblioso is like jail but we have to share.” (Photo/Hamada Elrasam)

Used condoms and condoms covers throughn on the ground in Gibiloso, Kigali, Rwanda. Wed, Nov 15, 2013.

Used condoms and condoms covers throughn on the ground in Gibiloso, Kigali, Rwanda. Wed, Nov 15, 2013.

Kayitesi Janet a 19 years old at Nadaguswi Chez Mamadada prostitution house in Gibiloso, Kigali. Mon, Nov 18, 2013. Kayitesi Janet, a 19 years old prostitute and a genocide orphan who is HIV positive said, "I didn't know what HIV meant a year ago.  I just recognized it when I was sick and the doctor asked me to test. Then I started medications. But I couldn't stop working.  I have to get food and pay transportation to the hospital when I get tired or when I go to receive medications. Sometimes I skip doses when the medicine finishes and I don't have enough money to go to the hospital to receive more.  At that moment I have to find a client or someone to give me money. Sometimes people here tell me you will die soon, which makes feel so scared and alone." (Photo/Hamada Elrasam

Kayitesi Janet a 19 years old at Nadaguswi Chez Mamadada prostitution house in Gibiloso, Kigali. Mon, Nov 18, 2013. Kayitesi Janet, a 19 years old prostitute and a genocide orphan who is HIV positive said, “I didn’t know what HIV meant a year ago. I just recognized it when I was sick and the doctor asked me to test. Then I started medications. But I couldn’t stop working. I have to get food and pay transportation to the hospital when I get tired or when I go to receive medications. Sometimes I skip doses when the medicine finishes and I don’t have enough money to go to the hospital to receive more. At that moment I have to find a client or someone to give me money. Sometimes people here tell me you will die soon, which makes feel so scared and alone.”
(Photo/Hamada Elrasam

Negnzi Alliy, a 23 year old (L) paint's a tattoo depects the Rwandan genocide slogan says in English  "never again" on Tomy's arm (R) in Titanic par in Gibiloso, Kigali, Rwanda. Tuesday, Nov 5, 2013. Negnzi Alliy says "I don't care about HIV transmission through my needles. Gibiloso is killing our generation softly." (Photo/Hamada Elrasam)

Negnzi Alliy, a 23 year old (L) paint’s a tattoo depects the Rwandan genocide slogan says in English “never again” on Tomy’s arm (R) in Titanic par in Gibiloso, Kigali, Rwanda. Tuesday, Nov 5, 2013. Negnzi Alliy says “I don’t care about HIV transmission through my needles. Gibiloso is killing our generation softly.”
(Photo/Hamada Elrasam)

Negnzi Alliy, a 23 year old getting payed for tattoo that he made with drugs in Titanic par in Gibiloso, Kigali, Rwanda. Tuesday, Nov 5, 2013. Negnzi Alliy says ""Many people ask me to make for them tattoos with anti-genocide slogans like 'Never Again' or 'strong survivors.'  Some others needs love tattoos.  Sometimes they pay with drugs or offer sex." (Photo/Hamada Elrasam)

Negnzi Alliy, a 23 year old getting payed for tattoo that he made with drugs in Titanic par in Gibiloso, Kigali, Rwanda. Tuesday, Nov 5, 2013. Negnzi Alliy says “”Many people ask me to make for them tattoos with anti-genocide slogans like ‘Never Again’ or ‘strong survivors.’ Some others needs love tattoos. Sometimes they pay with drugs or offer sex.” (Photo/Hamada Elrasam)

Negnzi Alliy, a 23 year old tattoo painter and genocide orphan at his house in Gibiloso, Kigali, Rwanda. (Photo/Hamada Elrasam)

Negnzi Alliy, a 23 year old tattoo painter and genocide orphan at his house in Gibiloso, Kigali, Rwanda. (Photo/Hamada Elrasam)

Shakuol, a 20 years old video editor and genocide orphan at his stodiu talks to clients while making wedding vedio editing in Gibiloso, Kigali, Rwanda. Wed, Nov 20, 2013. (Photo/Hamada Elrasam)

Shakuol, a 20 years old video editor and genocide orphan at his stodiu talks to clients while making wedding vedio editing in Gibiloso, Kigali, Rwanda. Wed, Nov 20, 2013. (Photo/Hamada Elrasam)

Shakuol, a 20 years old video editor and genocide orphan at his stodiu with African painting in the background depects a mom holds a baby in Gibiloso, Kigali, Rwanda. Wed, Nov 20, 2013. (Photo/Hamada Elrasam)

Shakuol, a 20 years old video editor and genocide orphan at his stodiu with African painting in the background depects a mom holds a baby in Gibiloso, Kigali, Rwanda. Wed, Nov 20, 2013. (Photo/Hamada Elrasam)

Nshizirungu Amos (L) and Vansing walks while young generation kids are coming in Gibiloso, Kigali, Rwanda. Wed, Nov 13, 2013.  The Rwanda genocide supplanted orphans who still struggle lack of opportunities, terminally diseases, loneliness and distrust, which threaten the new generation to follow the same pattern. (Photo/Hamada Elrasam)

Nshizirungu Amos (L) and Vansing walks while young generation kids are coming in Gibiloso, Kigali, Rwanda. Wed, Nov 13, 2013. The Rwanda genocide supplanted orphans who still struggle lack of opportunities, terminally diseases, loneliness and distrust, which threaten the new generation to follow the same pattern. (Photo/Hamada Elrasam)

 


Hundreds of orphans from Rwanda‘s 1994 genocide still struggle in Kigali’s slums, many working as drug dealers or prostitutes to stay alive.  Life in the Gibiloso district is proof that one of Africa’s greatest tragedies is not nearly over.

I visited Gibiloso in Kigali, Rwanda where many 1994 Genocide and HIV orphans struggle to survive.
Van-sing, a 20 years old Rwandan man, who escaped a cruel orphanage in a banana truck. “I liked bananas too much. I jumped in the truck to eat some banana and then I waited their until it reached somewhere and the driver discovered me and pushed me away! After then I came to Gibiloso to find the real family.”
Orphans of the Rwandan genocide, Van-Sing and others were left picking pockets, gambling and fighting for money. Van-Sing says “Life in Giblioso is like jail but we have to share.  We have to care from each other as well.  Children in Gibiloso also fight for survival. “I don’t like to see young kids suffering or fighting like I did,” Van-Sing added.
Kuitonda David, a 24 year old genocide orphan works on a pool table and shares bed with his work mate, Nzamwita Afrodis, who is HIV positive, said “Sometimes friends tell me, ‘You might get infected because of sharing things with him.’ It’s very hard to get a proper advice from people here, most of them are HIV positive and they can’t protect or advise themselves. As far as we share bed but we don’t actually meet.  The time I’m working he is sleeping and vice versa. But I always pray and ask the Virgin Merry to help me and protect me. She is my mom, my best friend.”Kayitesi Janet, a 19 years old prostitute and a genocide orphan who is HIV positive said, “I didn’t know what HIV meant a year ago.  I just recognized it when I was sick and the doctor asked me to test. Then I started medications. But I couldn’t stop working.  I have to get food and pay transportation to the hospital when I get tired or when I go to receive medications. Sometimes I skip doses when the medicine finishes and I don’t have enough money to go to the hospital to receive more.  At that moment I have to find a client or someone to give me money. Sometimes people here tell me you will die soon, which makes feel so scared and alone.”
Negnzi Alliy, a 23 year old tattoo painter and genocide orphan, said, “Many people ask me to make for them tattoos with anti-genocide slogans like ‘Never Again’ or ‘strong survivors.’  Some others needs love tattoos.  Sometimes they pay with drugs or offer sex. I don’t care about HIV transmission through my needles. Gibiloso is killing our generation softly.”

Shakuol, a 20 years old video editor and genocide orphan, said, “I’m working on editing video and recording music for some songs. Sometimes I make adds designs. I have been working many jobs until I got this computer and those sound system equipment.. At the moment my income is enough for electricity and house rent. It’s not enough to pay for internet even when I work all the day long. Sometimes I don’t get enough time to stay with my friends. But, every night before I go to sleep, I look at this African painting on the wall and memorize my mom who I lost during the genocide.”

The story on Voice Of America “VOA”

http://www.voanews.com/media/photogallery/sons-and-daughters-of-the-rwandan-genocide/1886581.html

The story on Panorama “Mada Masr”

http://panorama.madamasr.com/2014/the-continuing-effects-of-the-rawanda-genocide-by-hamada-elrasam/

Please click the link to watch the video

Image  —  Posted: June 21, 2014 in Uncategorized

Art of Humanities

The Egyptian State ban the activities of the Muslim Brotherhood and its NGO, confiscating its assets and capital.

The verdict hits one of the most effective NGOs in Egypt “Al-Gamia Al-Shariah ” which runs many hospitals some of them are specialized in treating prematurely born infants for %100 free “not even paying tips”, more over worth mentioning it treats infants according to their health critical case or the family’s financial class and not according to the families believes or confessions.

The second target that the verdict hits was the employees and their families who they take care from. “We will delay the employees monthly payment until we find a way to pay them, our main aim is to rescue these infants lifes! All the employees agree with this idea, we can wait, but infants on respirators couldn’t!” Dr. Magdy Ali the GM of Al-Gamia Al-Shariah hospital said.02

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حضانات الجمعيه  الشرعيه بالماظه تصوير حماده الرسام06

حضانات الجمعيه  الشرعيه بالماظه تصوير حماده الرسام13حضانات الجمعيه  الشرعيه بالماظه تصوير حماده الرسام26حضانات الجمعيه  الشرعيه بالماظه تصوير حماده الرسام13 2حضانات الجمعيه  الشرعيه بالماظه تصوير حماده الرسام05

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An Egyptian woman flashes Rabaa sign during the 3rd memory for the Egyptian revolution in Tahrir, Cairo, Egypt. Saturday, Jan 25, 2014. (Photo/Hamada Elrasam)

An Egyptian woman flashes Rabaa sign during the 3rd memory for the Egyptian revolution in Tahrir, Cairo, Egypt. Saturday, Jan 25, 2014. (Photo/Hamada Elrasam)

Image  —  Posted: February 3, 2014 in Uncategorized
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U.S. Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg visits Cairo University on Jan. 30th, 2012.  Ginsburg was in Egypt to 'listen and learn' as Egypt's constitutional transition to democracy begins.  Ginsburg says that Egyptians no longer live in a dictatorship, and now it’s the time for democracy. (Photo by  Hamada Elrasam)

U.S. Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg visits Cairo University on Jan. 30th, 2012. Ginsburg was in Egypt to ‘listen and learn’ as Egypt’s constitutional transition to democracy begins. Ginsburg says that Egyptians no longer live in a dictatorship, and now it’s the time for democracy. (Photo by Hamada Elrasam)

Two days after Ginsburg’s visit”   One man (L) holds a sign that says, "Continuing military control of the country means mass murder every day."  Another (R) holds a sign that says, "Mubarak's Supreme Council of Armed Forces is still attacking Tahrir Square." Feb. 2nd, 2012. (Photo by  Hamada Elrasam)

Two days after Ginsburg’s visit” One man (L) holds a sign that says, “Continuing military control of the country means mass murder every day.” Another (R) holds a sign that says, “Mubarak’s Supreme Council of Armed Forces is still attacking Tahrir Square.” Feb. 2nd, 2012. (Photo by Hamada Elrasam)

Riot police close all roads to the Interior Ministry with soldiers and barbed wire-fences.  Six-year-old Yasser cannot get to his home near the ministry in Cairo on Feb. 2nd, 2012.  The day before, 74 people were killed violently following a soccer match in Port Said. (Photo by  Hamada Elrasam)

Riot police close all roads to the Interior Ministry with soldiers and barbed wire-fences. Six-year-old Yasser cannot get to his home near the ministry in Cairo on Feb. 2nd, 2012. The day before, 74 people were killed violently following a soccer match in Port Said. (Photo by Hamada Elrasam)

Protesters carry a sign that says, “All Cops Are Bastards,” a play on the Interior Ministry’s slogan, on Feb. 2nd, 2012.  An other protester holds a sign that says, "Where were the police during the soccer match?  They didn’t secure it, so they were involved in what happened there." (Photo by  Hamada Elrasam)

Protesters carry a sign that says, “All Cops Are Bastards,” a play on the Interior Ministry’s slogan, on Feb. 2nd, 2012. An other protester holds a sign that says, “Where were the police during the soccer match? They didn’t secure it, so they were involved in what happened there.” (Photo by Hamada Elrasam)

This solder begins to cry as protesters shout, saying that all Egyptians are brothers and urging the officers to ignore orders to kill protesters at the Interior Ministry in Cairo, Egypt, Feb. 2nd, 2012. (Photo by  Hamada Elrasam)

This solder begins to cry as protesters shout, saying that all Egyptians are brothers and urging the officers to ignore orders to kill protesters at the Interior Ministry in Cairo, Egypt, Feb. 2nd, 2012. (Photo by Hamada Elrasam)

Soldiers withdraw, as they fire teargas at protesters near the Interior Ministry in Cairo, on Thursday, Feb. 2nd, 2012.  Thousands demonstrated outside the Ministry, protesting the security forces' failure to prevent a soccer riot that killed more than 194 people. (Photo by  Hamada Elrasam)

Soldiers withdraw, as they fire teargas at protesters near the Interior Ministry in Cairo, on Thursday, Feb. 2nd, 2012. Thousands demonstrated outside the Ministry, protesting the security forces’ failure to prevent a soccer riot that killed more than 194 people. (Photo by Hamada Elrasam)

A protester captures a riot police van near Tahrir Square on Feb. 2nd, 2012.   Protesters said they sent the soldiers back to their camp in an ambulance, but no one was hurt.  Other protesters guard the vehicle from potential vandalism. (Photo by  Hamada Elrasam)

A protester captures a riot police van near Tahrir Square on Feb. 2nd, 2012. Protesters said they sent the soldiers back to their camp in an ambulance, but no one was hurt. Other protesters guard the vehicle from potential vandalism. (Photo by Hamada Elrasam)

Protesters fight with the police all the night long, and into the next day.  Some throw bricks at the riot police, and others display victory signs during the clashes at the Interior Ministry in Cairo, Egypt, Thursday Feb. 2nd, 2012.  (Photo by  Hamada Elrasam)

Protesters fight with the police all the night long, and into the next day. Some throw bricks at the riot police, and others display victory signs during the clashes at the Interior Ministry in Cairo, Egypt, Thursday Feb. 2nd, 2012. (Photo by Hamada Elrasam)

Egyptian police officers  aim at protesters during clashes near the Interior Ministry in Cairo on Feb. 3rd, 2012.  The day before, police fired teargas at thousands of demonstrators outside the Interior Ministry protesting the security forces' failure to prevent a soccer riot that killed more than 74 people. (Photo by  Hamada Elrasam)

Egyptian police officers aim at protesters during clashes near the Interior Ministry in Cairo on Feb. 3rd, 2012. The day before, police fired teargas at thousands of demonstrators outside the Interior Ministry protesting the security forces’ failure to prevent a soccer riot that killed more than 74 people. (Photo by Hamada Elrasam)

Nora, a 5 year old child, covers her face with teargas mask 100 meters away from the clashes near Tahrir Square in Cairo on Feb. 3rd, 2012.  A volunteer doctor says protesters are angry over the deadly soccer riot and at least one man died the clashes. (Photo by  Hamada Elrasam)

Nora, a 5 year old child, covers her face with teargas mask 100 meters away from the clashes near Tahrir Square in Cairo on Feb. 3rd, 2012. A volunteer doctor says protesters are angry over the deadly soccer riot and at least one man died the clashes. (Photo by Hamada Elrasam)

After two days of clashes, an Egyptian protester tries to extinguish a teargas can fired by the security forces during clashes near the Interior Ministry in Cairo on Feb. 3, 2012. (Photo by  Hamada Elrasam)

After two days of clashes, an Egyptian protester tries to extinguish a teargas can fired by the security forces during clashes near the Interior Ministry in Cairo on Feb. 3, 2012. (Photo by Hamada Elrasam)

Some protests continue peacefully against the Supreme Council of Armed Forces on Feb 3rd, 2012.  In its latest report, the Ministry of Health says five people are in critical condition from asphyxia due to tear gas attacks. (Photo by  Hamada Elrasam)

Some protests continue peacefully against the Supreme Council of Armed Forces on Feb 3rd, 2012. In its latest report, the Ministry of Health says five people are in critical condition from asphyxia due to tear gas attacks. (Photo by Hamada Elrasam)

Women chant, "Remove the SCAF!" in Tahrir Square on Feb. 3, 2012. Volleys of tear gas left a white cloud over the streets near police offices in the second day of clashes between security forces and rock-throwing youth protesting a deadly soccer riot. (Photo by  Hamada Elrasam)

Women chant, “Remove the SCAF!” in Tahrir Square on Feb. 3, 2012. Volleys of tear gas left a white cloud over the streets near police offices in the second day of clashes between security forces and rock-throwing youth protesting a deadly soccer riot. (Photo by Hamada Elrasam)

A woman weeps during the protests in Tahrir Square in Cairo on Feb. 2012.  She asks why the police didn’t use the teargas at the soccer riot two days ago. (Photo by  Hamada Elrasam)

A woman weeps during the protests in Tahrir Square in Cairo on Feb. 2012. She asks why the police didn’t use the teargas at the soccer riot two days ago. (Photo by Hamada Elrasam)

A protester wears teargas cans fired by security forces at the Interior Ministry in Cairo on Feb. 3rd, 2012. Some analysts say chemicals in the teargas have been internationally prohibited since 1993. (Photo by  Hamada Elrasam)

A protester wears teargas cans fired by security forces at the Interior Ministry in Cairo on Feb. 3rd, 2012. Some analysts say chemicals in the teargas have been internationally prohibited since 1993. (Photo by Hamada Elrasam)

Several people collapse because of the teargas fired by the security forces in the second day of clashes on Feb. 3, 2012. (Photo by  Hamada Elrasam)

Several people collapse because of the teargas fired by the security forces in the second day of clashes on Feb. 3, 2012. (Photo by Hamada Elrasam)

A street vendor sells teargas masks near the clashes at the Interior Ministry in Cairo on Feb. 3, 2012. (Photo by  Hamada Elrasam)

A street vendor sells teargas masks near the clashes at the Interior Ministry in Cairo on Feb. 3, 2012. (Photo by Hamada Elrasam)

This man collapses due to teargas poisoning and protesters attempt to get him to a hospital on Feb. 3rd, 2012. (Photo by  Hamada Elrasam)

This man collapses due to teargas poisoning and protesters attempt to get him to a hospital on Feb. 3rd, 2012. (Photo by Hamada Elrasam)

This teargas can, labeled, MADE IN U.S.A. is found outside Interior Ministry in Cairo on Feb. 3rd, 2012.  Only a few days before protesters were attacked, U.S. Supreme Court Justice Ginsburg visited Cairo, saying “Now it’s time for democracy.” (Photo by  Hamada Elrasam)

This teargas can, labeled, MADE IN U.S.A. is found outside Interior Ministry in Cairo on Feb. 3rd, 2012. Only a few days before protesters were attacked, U.S. Supreme Court Justice Ginsburg visited Cairo, saying “Now it’s time for democracy.” (Photo by Hamada Elrasam)

Image  —  Posted: December 14, 2013 in Uncategorized

http://www.voanews.com/content/reu-egyptian-police-fire-tear-gas-to-end-cairo-clashes/1805100.html